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L.A.M.P.

Web app screen shot

I like word games, I won’t lie, so I was pretty chuffed when I came up with the idea of creating a lamp that runs LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL, and PHP—one of the predominant acronyms behind the scenes on the web, both because of its robustness and its appealing freeness).

Puns aside, the idea is simple: I wanted to give people (especially strangers) remote control over a physical object in my house. My initial goal was to implement a RESTful interface for as many different channels of user interaction as possible, and to that end, I built a PHP script that will accept input from as many sources as I could think of and a single web front-end that displays the results.

--INSTRUCTIONS--

Open http://chinaalbino.com/UN/light.php

1) Scenario: You're in my house
     Use the light switch!

2) Scenario: You're on the internet
    -Run the Processing sketch that
      allows you to switch the light.
    -Use the web interface directly.
    -Send dengdengalex[at]gmail an
     email with 0, 1, or 2 in the body.
          0 turns the light off,
          1 turns the light on,
          2 tells you the light's status

3) Scenario: You're on a mobile device
     -Send an email as above.
     -Text "alexlight" followed by a:
          0 to turn the light off,
          1 to turn the light on,
          2 to get the light's status

Following this fabulous tutorial, I built an Arduino-controllable power outlet. Though I chose a lamp, the system can accommodate anything that can be controlled either with an on/off switch or a relay.

There is a php script that is triggered every couple of seconds by the Arduino which records the state of the switch connected to the outlet and another script that changes that state when it receives input (via web, text message, Processing, or email) and displays the state information on a web page. The final script runs in the background on the server polling for new email.

There are a couple of little fixes that I probably won’t get around to but I will mention so I won’t forget them, the most significant being the meta refresh method I’m currently using to check for the light’s status on the web page. I know I could call a php script in the background using AJAX, I just haven’t figured out how yet, so in the interim, I’m reloading the whole page every two seconds. Because it’s so small, the user probably won’t notice, at least not until his browser crashes.

The other major problem is email. There’s a bit of a lag. If it weren’t for my sucky hosting company, I’d be able to run a cron job on the server to check for new email every five seconds or so, but my host limits me to running jobs every fifteen minutes or on a specific minute of each hour. I tried several workarounds (putting fifteen minutes-worth of looping in the script so that it runs the entire time before it is next called => crashed the server; adding the same job 60 times, one for each minute => the server ends up synchronizing the jobs and calling about a quarter of them every fifteen minutes).

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